Age effects: Correlation, causation, and socialization

Recently, when working with undergraduates to design a new experiment, they told me that they preferred to recruit participants under 40 in order to control for age effects in attitudes toward using technology.

Actually, that’s not quite what they said. “Older people are slower to change to new technologies,” is the quote I remember.

I acknowledged that I had seen “age effects” in my recent research — which I had just asked them to read through, though that summary didn’t include in which direction the age effects were seen. For the pilot study, I conceded that it might be wise to narrow the sampling to an age range that is more easily recruited around a college campus.

But privately, I started wondering – Do I believe, as they apparently do, that older people are usually slower to “get” technology? After all, **I** am older than 40. I could argue that, given my life circumstances as an adult returning student, I am learning new technologies at a **faster** pace than those younger than me simply because I am playing catch-up. But, in my more honest moments, I know I am more set in my ways than when I was 20 or 25. … Except, I might only be set in ways that I’ve learned the hard way from bad experiences, including from technologies that promise more than they deliver, while I stay open to new possibilities. … Except, I’ve known plenty of tech curmudgeons older than me, so I very well might be the exception. Except,  …

Continue reading “Age effects: Correlation, causation, and socialization”

July 2018 note: Back to blogging?

It’s been a while since I posted here. Plenty has happened to me! I:

  • Switched my master’s degree field from media arts and science to human-computer interaction.
  • Earned a master’s of science degree in human-computer interaction from Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI.
  • Sold my condo in Downtown Indianapolis, Ind.
  • Spent a summer renting a friend’s lake house in Carmel, Ind.
  • Moved to an apartment in the Shadyside neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Penn.
  • Began work as a doctoral student researcher at the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science.

Thanks to some timely help from an undergraduate student here, I have this blog up and running again. Given I am already working 40+ hours again, I don’t know if I will be able to keep it up, but I hope to keep posting from time to time – maybe when I’m drinking my morning coffee.

Coffee and newspaper for reading roundup post
Coffee and a newspaper. Photo credit: cafemama via photopin cc

Samsung Gear VR + Edge S7 could popularize virtual reality

People often ask me why I decided to study human-computer interaction after a long career in journalism and media. For me, it’s primarily because of the chance to be on the frontlines of tech innovation and explore the different ways that computing in its current forms — social, ubiquitous and immersive — are impacting media, the law and our society.

Continue reading “Samsung Gear VR + Edge S7 could popularize virtual reality”